About the book

At seven, Sosi is stoned by a group of village children, taunting her with cries of “infidel.” Her father is a Muslim Turk, her mother a Christian Armenian, and they haven’t forgotten the Turks’ extermination of 1.5 million Armenians. Moved to safety in the city, Sosi awaits her parents’ return, only to discover they have been murdered by their own neighbours.
In the safety of the Reijskinds' home, Sosi waits in vain for her parents to come back for her; only to discover they have been murdered by their own neighbours. Sosi is raised by the Reijskinds, and later moves with them to Jerusalem, where she meets a Ara, a radical young Armenian photographer. Sosi becomes pregnant with Ara’s child, and they subsquently wed. But Ara is desperate to go to Turkey, to force the Turks to admit to their extermination of his people, to document the disappearance of the Armenians. Ara disappears himself. Sosi moves to Montreal with their daughter Sammi, where eventually Ara rejoins her after being found in a Turkish prison by another relative who pays for his release.

The realities of war, genocide and global immigration and their impact on subsequent generations are revealed through the story of Sosi: a survivor, a traveller, a mother, an Armenian.

About the author

Ghan, Linda

Originally from Weyburn, Saskatchewan, Linda Ghan was an accomplished author of fiction, drama and journalism. Her first novel, A Gift of Sky, had two editions in Canada as well as publication in translation in Japan. Her children’s story, Muhla, The Fair One, was commissioned and performed by Montreal’s Black Theatre Workshop and published by Nuage Editions. Ghan moved to Japan in 1996 and published many articles for Japanese dailies and the non-fiction book Gaston Petit: The Kimono and the Cross, before returning to fiction with Sosi.

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Reviews

Who remembers the Armenians?

This was the question that Adolf Hitler is said to have asked when he embarked on the genocide of European Jewry in the 1930s.

It was considered at the time… >>

— Sharon Chisvin The Winnipeg Free Press

Who remembers the Armenians?

This was the question that Adolf Hitler is said to have asked when he embarked on the genocide of European Jewry in the 1930s.

It was considered at the time… >>

— Sharon Chisvin The Winnipeg Free Press

Black, White and Grey 

Historical fiction, when it's good, breathes life into the past, blending imagination with fact to educate and engage.  

Sosi examines the Armenian genocide and its aftermath through the story… >>

— Catherine Paquette Montreal Review of Books


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